Brain Food For A Wednesday Eve http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/ en-us © 2018 RadioLillooet Select Literature, Insighful Lectures & Fine Drama Michael Hawes Bringing you select books, insightful lectures and fine dramas. Join us on Wed. Evenings at 8:00 pm and enjoy one of the best aspects of radio. Bringing you select books, insightful lectures and fine dramas. Join us on Wed. Evenings at 8:00 pm and enjoy one of the best aspects of radio. RadioLillooet station@radiolillooet.ca Seven Stories by H.P. Lovecraft - HPLSS#1 (Story 1 to Story 4) Michael Hawes “Gorgons, and Hydras, and Chimaeras—dire stories of Celaeno and the Harpies—may reproduce themselves in the brain of superstition—but they were there before. They are transcripts, types—the archetypes are in us, and eternal. How else should the recital of that which we know in a waking sense to be false come to affect us at all? Is it that we naturally conceive terror from such objects, considered in their capacity of being able to inflict upon us bodily injury? O, least of all! These terrors are of older standing. They date beyond body—or without the body, they would have been the same. . . . That the kind of fear here treated is purely spiritual—that it is strong in proportion as it is objectless on earth, that it predominates in the period of our sinless infancy—are difficulties the solution of which might afford some probable insight into our ante-mundane condition, and a peep at least into the shadowland of pre-existence.” —Charles Lamb: “Witches and Other Night-Fears” “Gorgons, and Hydras, and Chimaeras—dire stories of Celaeno and the Harpies—may reproduce themselves in the brain of superstition—but they were there before. They are transcripts, types—the archetypes are in us, and eternal. How else should the recital of that which we know in a waking sense to be false come to affect us at all? Is it that we naturally conceive terror from such objects, considered in their capacity of being able to inflict upon us bodily injury? O, least of all! These terrors are of older standing. They date beyond body—or without the body, they would have been the same. . . . That the kind of fear here treated is purely spiritual—that it is strong in proportion as it is objectless on earth, that it predominates in the period of our sinless infancy—are difficulties the solution of which might afford some probable insight into our ante-mundane condition, and a peep at least into the shadowland of pre-existence.” —Charles Lamb: “Witches and Other Night-Fears” http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/posts/1373/ Tue, 14 Aug 2018 14:36:39 -0700 RadioLillooet DH#2 (Part 3) Michael Hawes Conclusion of H. P. Lovecraft’s, The Dunwich Horror Before there was Goosebumps, there was Lovecraft. Up next: Seven Short Stories by H. P. Lovecraft in three parts. Starts Aug 15th. Conclusion of H. P. Lovecraft’s, The Dunwich Horror Before there was Goosebumps, there was Lovecraft. Up next: Seven Short Stories by H. P. Lovecraft in three parts. Starts Aug 15th. http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/posts/1371/ Tue, 07 Aug 2018 13:18:52 -0700 RadioLillooet H.P. Lovecraft - The Dunwich Horror - DH#1 (Parts 1 & 2) Michael Hawes Part One of H. P. Lovecraft's, The Dunwich Horror Before there was Goosebumps, there was Lovecraft. Part One of H. P. Lovecraft's, The Dunwich Horror Before there was Goosebumps, there was Lovecraft. http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/posts/1369/ Mon, 30 Jul 2018 19:39:36 -0700 RadioLillooet ATG#6 (Chapter 11 to Chapter 12) Michael Hawes Final Part of Jacob Abbott’s book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander’s education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. Next up: H. P. Lovecraft's The Dunwich Horror Starts on Aug 1, 2018 Final Part of Jacob Abbott’s book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander’s education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. Next up: H. P. Lovecraft's The Dunwich Horror Starts on Aug 1, 2018 http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/posts/1367/ Wed, 25 Jul 2018 16:23:19 -0700 RadioLillooet ATG#5 (Chapter 9 to Chapter 10) Michael Hawes Part Five of Six in a Presentation of Jacob Abbott’s book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander’s education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. Part Five of Six in a Presentation of Jacob Abbott’s book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander’s education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/posts/1362/ Tue, 10 Jul 2018 13:52:50 -0700 RadioLillooet ATG#4 (Chapter 7 to Chapter 8) Michael Hawes Part Four of Six in a Presentation of Jacob Abbott’s book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander’s education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. Part Four of Six in a Presentation of Jacob Abbott’s book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander’s education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/posts/1360/ Tue, 03 Jul 2018 22:12:31 -0700 RadioLillooet ATG#3 (Chapter 5 to Chapter 6) Michael Hawes Part Three of Six in a Presentation of Jacob Abbott’s book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander’s education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. Part Three of Six in a Presentation of Jacob Abbott’s book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander’s education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/posts/1358/ Tue, 26 Jun 2018 22:22:02 -0700 RadioLillooet ATG#2 (Chapter 3 to Chapter4) Michael Hawes Part Two of Six in a Presentation of Jacob Abbott’s book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander’s education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. Part Two of Six in a Presentation of Jacob Abbott’s book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander’s education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/posts/1356/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:16:01 -0700 RadioLillooet ATG#1 (Chapter1 to Chapter2) Michael Hawes Part One of Six in a Presentation of Jacob Abbott's book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander's education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. Part One of Six in a Presentation of Jacob Abbott's book, Alexander The Great. When Alexander was 13 he began study under a Aristotle and at age 16 Alexander's education ended. On either 10 or 11 June 323 BC, Alexander died in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar II, in Babylon, at age 32. He left an Empire that stretched from the Adriatic to the Indus River and a world that was changed forever - the one we now inhabit. http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/posts/1354/ Tue, 12 Jun 2018 22:00:47 -0700 RadioLillooet EWMT#2 (Part Two) Michael Hawes Part Two of An Evening With Mark Twain We begin with a piece entitled: “1601- A Conversation As It Was By The Social Fireside In The Time Of The Tudors” -a humorous piece of epic satire that answers the literary question, “How would Shakespeare describe a fart?” We finish with an essay entitled, “Concerning The Jew” which was first published in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Vol. 99 in Sep. of 1899. Besides the intellect, sagacity, common sense and humanity inherent in this essay, we are treated to the mellifluous voice of Michelle Fry of Baton Rouge, La. who is our narrator. It’s a win-win for those that tune in. Part Two of An Evening With Mark Twain We begin with a piece entitled: “1601- A Conversation As It Was By The Social Fireside In The Time Of The Tudors” -a humorous piece of epic satire that answers the literary question, “How would Shakespeare describe a fart?” We finish with an essay entitled, “Concerning The Jew” which was first published in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine Vol. 99 in Sep. of 1899. Besides the intellect, sagacity, common sense and humanity inherent in this essay, we are treated to the mellifluous voice of Michelle Fry of Baton Rouge, La. who is our narrator. It’s a win-win for those that tune in. http://radiolillooet.ca/s/brain-food-for-a-wednesday-eve/posts/1350/ Tue, 05 Jun 2018 13:46:44 -0700 RadioLillooet